Next time you’re at the store, keep these snacks in mind because it’s easy to grab a not-so-healthy quick fix for a lil’ snackie, but it’s imperative that we love our bodies too with wholesome foods. It’s all about consistency. Sure I promote balance and allow treats like a couple ‘Chocolate Covered Brownie Pops‘ when they’re calling my name 😉 but of course,  I feel so much better when I stay on track with healthy snacks instead.

I am SO envious of you guys for your ability to just trot into a store and buy whatever vegan cheeses, faux meats etc. your hearts desire. We get hideous vegan cheese here, you can’t even call it cheese because it borders on melted plastic and quorn, which tends to be made using egg white base so bollocks to vegans. The only other alternatives are heinously tough hotdogs that never sell. I am seriously thinking of starting a sodding Aussie vegan food company right here! You want easy peasy seitan hotdogs that will knock anything else out of the ballpark? Just get your dry ingredients sorted, bosh in your wet, mix and roll in foil then steam. DONE. Mary’s test kitchen rules for creating these babies. We have them a lot. We thought that the flavour was a little low so we just doubled everything in the flavour recipe aside from the coconut oil and chilli and they are Steve’s go to favourite hotdogs now. Try these. You will love them. I guarantee! http://www.marystestkitchen.com/vegan-hot-dogs-2-paprika-seitan-sausages/
Going vegan doesn't mean you don't get to eat snacks. You may be wondering what you can snack on in between meals, late at night, or just when you're out and about and on the go. There's plenty to choose from. You don't have to just eat carrot sticks, although, with a bit of hummus or some vegan ranch dressing, veggies are fantastic healthy vegan snacks.
They're mini health packets. Fresh herbs are calorie-free and loaded with antioxidants and other healthy ingredients. Basil and mint contain compounds that are potential cancer fighters; rosemary may help fight memory loss; and cilantro appears to slow the growth of certain bacteria that cause food-borne illness. Herbs are also a viable source of vitamins: 2 tablespoons of fresh basil, for example, delivers 27 percent of your recommended daily quotient of vitamin K, and just a handful of chives provides 10 percent of your daily requirement for vitamins A and C.
Sizzle up a slice of this breakfast favorite for a savory protein boost—so long as you think you can cut yourself off after a slice or two. Recent research has found that processed meats, such as hot dogs and bacon, are carcinogenic to humans, however eating the stuff in moderation isn't a major risk, say diet experts. The more you eat, the higher your risk of disease.
What about evening snacking? The biggest problem with nighttime snacks is most of us reach for ice cream and chips-not fruit and yogurt. That's not to say you can't have a treat after dinner. Some of your favorite evening snacks may even be on this list (chocolate! popcorn!). One thing to note, if you're always hungry after dinner, make sure your meal is made up of filling and healthy foods and you're getting enough food. If all you're nibbling on is a lackluster salad you may legitimately be hungry and need an evening snack(see our best dinner foods for weight loss). If you love an evening snack after dinner, serve yourself a healthy portion onto a plate or bowl so you're not scooping straight from the container.
Skip the typical pasta and sauce and make some super Easy Peanut Noodles. You’ll most likely have all the ingredients you need on hand. Peanut noodles taste divine, make fantastic leftovers and are superbly filling. For any peanut butter lover like myself, peanut noodles make an outstanding savory meal and they’re high in protein! Try these Noodles With Peanut-Miso Sauce and feel free to swap out the kelp noodles for noodles of your choice. For the lazy cook, make a large batch of Zucchini Noodles and use them sporadically throughout the week. These raw noodles would taste fresh and zesty with a peanut sauce. For the sauce, make sure to add miso to it as this will provide luxurious tastes and that umami flavor we all crave.
This another “snack” that I personally wouldn’t choose. Coffee really doesn’t fill you up and soy milk is heavily processed. Every now and then, we all need a pick me up. You can have about a cup and a half of “light soy milk” but make sure you check the brand you prefer so that you stick within 100 calories. Black coffee has zero calories, kids. That’s what I drink.
This CL-perfected stovetop technique makes smoking food easier than ever (though the salad is still tasty if you choose not to smoke the grains), and smoke is such a fun flavor to apply to unexpected ingredients like barley. A sweet vinaigrette, earthy beets, and the intense citrus twang of grapefruit balance the robust smoky hit of the grains for a memorable salad. To make sure you're getting the whole-grain version of barley, look for hulled, and skip past pearled.
Can snacking be a part of a healthy diet? Of course! When you choose a snack, choose one with protein, fat and/or fiber. All of these nutrients take longer to digest, so they fill you up. Snacks are also a great way to add extra nutrition to your day. Think of snacks like carrots and hummus, an apple with almond butter or whole-grain crackers with cheese.
Snacking helps prevent the dips in blood sugar that can make you famished. But in order to avoid overindulging, you need to control cravings. So make sure you are getting all the elements of a satisfying meal: healthy carbs, a touch of lip-smacking fat, and the linchpin — protein. If you switch out snacks (which is fine), don't replace the nuts and dairy with more sugary treats.

"Diet-friendly snacking doesn't necessarily have to be low-fat," says McLachlan. What's more important: Portion size. A homemade trail mix of walnuts, mini chocolate chips, and raisins is a snack that's satisfying (thanks to the sweetness and fat) and healthy for a dieter if portion sizes are kept in check. "Mix a palm full of walnuts with a pinch of chocolate chips and a pinch of raisins — it's not always realistic to measure," says McLachlan.
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