There are an abundance of pleasant palates that vegetarian snacks can placate, so the selection below is but a small sample. These recipes focus on collations that fit the needs of most vegetarians, however, these recipes are NOT vegan. For more options that DO meet the dietary restrictions for vegans, as well as more recommended vegetarian recipes, check out our vegan recipe page, and find additional ideas for vegetarian plates (that are not vegan) on our vegetarian recipe pages.
Vegan smoothies are filling, nourishing, packed with energizing plant foods and.. they’re good for the soul 🙂 Try the Bikini Ready Green Detox Smoothie or the Energizing Green Smoothie Bowl and get your greens in! Smoothie Bowls are amazing because you can add extra goodness from your favorite superfood toppings. You may be wondering, why would I sip my smoothie from a bowl?!! Smoothie bowls typically have a thicker consistency than a regular smoothie, making it fun to scoop up, along with crunchy toppings. Smoothie bowls feel more substantial to me, like an actual meal – because most regular smoothies don’t keep me full for long. Try it out!
And its cheap too. I was buying my chickpeas and processing them myself (resulting in a somewhat less than fine flour) as I thought that would be the cheapest way to get chickpea flour (as you do) and then I checked out the price difference at the health food shop and it was at least a dollar cheaper to buy the flour. Now I just buy the flour that is super fine and perfect for just about everything.
Popcorn is high in fiber and even delivers a little protein. A 1-ounce serving (about 3 cups) of air-popped popcorn has 4 grams of fiber, almost 4 grams of protein and clocks in at 110 calories. This combination makes it a snack with staying power. Popcorn is actually a whole grain and 3 cups is a huge serving-especially when you compare it to other crunchy, salty snacks like chips. Many companies are making bagged popcorn, see our favorite healthy popcorn picks.
Need to use up some leftover ingredients? Make a pita pizza! Don’t fret about making the dough, that’s what whole grain pita bread is for. While pita bread makes filling and tasty sandwiches, it’s also a great base for loading toppings on. Whole grain pita bread is typically high in protein and fiber, and it’s ideal for the lazy vegan because it’s already cooked for you! Pita pizza is also awesome because it’s just the right size for one person. Start with pita bread, spread on some sauce, add some non-dairy cheese, and pile on any vegetables you have on hand. This Vegan Pepper Jack Cashew Cheese is my favorite as it will add some spice to your Homemade Pita Bread. For an easy fix, use store-bought vegan cheese like Daiya or Tofutti. Mushrooms, tomatoes, spinach or broccoli are healthy options for vegetable toppings, and many of these can come frozen or from a jar. Check out this Ultimate Guide to Making Homemade Pizza and simply use a pita for the base. After assembled, pop your pita in an oven at 425 degrees for 8-10 minutes and you’ve got yourself a quick and wholesome meal.
If you're looking for a creative way to add more fruit to your diet, try frozen banana pops. Slice several peeled bananas in half and insert popsicle sticks. Coat each half with an ounce of low-fat plain yogurt. Put the pops in the freezer, and soon you'll have ready-to-eat low-calorie treats. At just under 80 calories a pop, this is a snack you can feel good about.
“You might assume that you can’t eat pulses like chickpeas, beans, and lentils on the keto diet. But you totally can, especially in smaller portions," says Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in the New York City area. "Pulses are a good source of satiating protein and an excellent source of filling fiber—and research shows that eating them daily can help your overall health and can even help you lose weight." Roast chickpeas and toss with oil (for added fat) and spices (to amp the flavor).
Americans love to snack almost as much as we want to lose weight. But according to research by the USDA, our snacking habits are adding too many calories and too few nutrients to our diets. It doesn't have to be this way, says Susan Bowerman, RD, assistant director of the UCLA Center for Human Nutrition. "When done right, (snacking) keeps your energy levels up and gives you more opportunities to get in all your nutritional needs."
For the BOSH! Balls: Preheat the oven to 180℃. Place the oats, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, coconut and pecan on a baking sheet and toast for 5- 10 minutes. Set aside and allow to cool. Place the dates, cinnamon, maple syrup, salt and vanilla in a food processor and puree. Remove and add to a mixing bowl. Add the cooled toasted oats, seeds and nuts and the chopped chocolate. Mix well together using your hands or a wooden spoon.

Raise your hand if you’re a snackaholic!  I’m guessing I’m not the only one with my hand in the air right now 🙂  I’m a firm believer that snacks are vital to our diets and keep us going between meals.  They’re great for giving us energy, curbing our sweet tooth and preventing us from getting hangry throughout the day.  Today we’re rounding up 16 of our favorite healthy snack recipes for you to enjoy!


“Crackers do not stave off hunger well,” Culbertson says. Low in fiber and high in sodium, this snack does not provide the energy boost most people are looking for during the afternoon, and you’re not likely to feel satisfied. (However, some crackers are high in fiber and low in sodium; and topping them with low-fat cheese takes them from a bad snack to a healthy one.) And if they’re not single-serving packages, Culbertson says, it's easy to eat too many.
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