Yogurt is and shall remain an important component in our snacking culture. And I’m not speaking of those over-sugared versions, but of proper plain natural yogurt. Make a craft out of it. You won’t believe how many different, almost artisan creations you can come up with. The ingredients of the version above are grapes, walnuts, some cinnamon and a few sprinkles of maple syrup. Love it! Up for more ideas? Have a look over here.

This CL-perfected stovetop technique makes smoking food easier than ever (though the salad is still tasty if you choose not to smoke the grains), and smoke is such a fun flavor to apply to unexpected ingredients like barley. A sweet vinaigrette, earthy beets, and the intense citrus twang of grapefruit balance the robust smoky hit of the grains for a memorable salad. To make sure you're getting the whole-grain version of barley, look for hulled, and skip past pearled.


Proof that good things come in small packages: these little cheese rounds. They may be tiny, but they're great for staving off hunger. "Babybel cheeses offer some protein that can help slow digestion and promote feelings of fullness and satiety," says Isabel Smith, MS, RD, CDN, registered dietitian and founder of Isabel Smith Nutrition. And if you can't get enough of the creamy stuff, pick up a few of these best cheeses for weight loss.
Who doesn’t love miso? It’s a soy-based drink/soup that originated in Japan. Love miso? For more information,please check out my posts Lose weight with miso 10 ways and also 10 Ways to curb your appetite – naturally; both feature miso as a starring example of a healthy, satisfying treat. Please note – miso is not ideal for people who need to avoid sodium/salt.
Who doesn’t love a good snack? They’re essential for staving off hunger between meals and keeping you fueled from your early morning workout until your late night dinner with friends. But small bites can also be a nutritional trap, providing few nutrients and tons of unnecessary calories. A 2012 study examining the diets of nearly 5,000 adults found that almost a third of their daily calorie intake was from “empty,” or nutritionally void, snack calories.
×