Going vegan doesn't mean you don't get to eat snacks. You may be wondering what you can snack on in between meals, late at night, or just when you're out and about and on the go. There's plenty to choose from. You don't have to just eat carrot sticks, although, with a bit of hummus or some vegan ranch dressing, veggies are fantastic healthy vegan snacks.
If you're craving something sweet and sinful, grab this mini pack of jelly beans. With just 4 calories in each bean, they're the slimmest way to enjoy cotton candy, toasted marshmallows, and strawberry shortcake. As an added bonus: Jelly Belly uses real fruit purees to flavor their beans. It's still candy in every sense, but it's certainly the lesser of many sugar-loaded evils.
Six grams of sugar in three of these chai-infused vanilla cookies?! It doesn't get much better than that. In lieu of butter, Bakeology uses coconut oil to bind the organic ingredients that make up their dessert, which is good news for your belly. The tropical oil converts into energy more easily than other types of fat, so less flab is apt to be stored on your frame. We're also big fans of the real bits of cinnamon, ginger, ground cloves and cardamom that give these cookies an authentic chai flavor.
Can’t get enough fall flavors in your life? You’ll dig these bite sized treats. (Plus, did you know pumpkin is a great source of vitamin A?) Cranberries add a dash of tart and fruity flavor to the mix. And because these muffins are made with Greek yogurt instead of butter, each mini muffin contains just three grams of fat. Photo and recipe: Emily Miller / Life by Daily Burn
Chocolate-topped digestive biscuits from brands like McVitie's are great candidates for veganizing. Here, we rely on toasted sugar to provide depth of flavor in the absence of lactose, and use coconut oil to make a dairy-free dough that's easy to handle. A blend of all-purpose and whole wheat flour supplies the right combination of toasty flavor and crisp-yet-tender texture. Top with the high-quality vegan chocolate of your choice.
“Crackers do not stave off hunger well,” Culbertson says. Low in fiber and high in sodium, this snack does not provide the energy boost most people are looking for during the afternoon, and you’re not likely to feel satisfied. (However, some crackers are high in fiber and low in sodium; and topping them with low-fat cheese takes them from a bad snack to a healthy one.) And if they’re not single-serving packages, Culbertson says, it's easy to eat too many.
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