Volumetrics is an eating plan championed by Barbara Rolls of Penn State University, and it's based on getting more mileage out of low-density foods. For example, a huge salad—or in this case, nearly 4 cups of popcorn—will leave you more satisfied than a square of chocolate, and for far fewer calories. If you're someone who gets depressed by measly portions, reach for healthy snacks that have a high water content like fruits, veggies—or our favorite crunchy munchie: popcorn. For a pre-popped variety, we love SkinnyPop because it's free of additives and tasty without being too salty.
Not really corn but that’s what the blogger to the original recipe (linked below) called it so I’ll stick with that. That was my first time trying the Field Roast frankfurters. Usually I don’t buy shit from the hippie section because of my lame soy sensitivity but I need to start looking more because these are soy free options (no one cares) there once I really looked. These very much inspire me to want to step up my seitan game. I like making lazy, flavorless seitan but I think it would be in my best interest to at least know how to recreate these. Total game changer!
Freekeh is a cereal made from roasted green wheat. That's the one and only ingredient in this snack's original blend, making it an ideal packaged snack. With zero sodium, four grams of fiber, six grams of protein, and only 130 calories per quarter-cup serving, you can help yourself to an extra-large serving. Try rosemary sage or tamari when you want to mix things up.
For a dairy-free take on addictive spinach-artichoke dip, a purée of cooked cauliflower and raw cashews proves impressively effective as a creamy base. We blitz them in the food processor along with the cauliflower cooking liquid, then add flavor to the mixture with vegan mayonnaise (homemade or store-bought), nutritional yeast, mustard, garlic powder, and lemon juice. Add the artichokes and cooked spinach, pulse until combined, and it's ready to be baked until browned and bubbling.
For a dairy-free take on addictive spinach-artichoke dip, a purée of cooked cauliflower and raw cashews proves impressively effective as a creamy base. We blitz them in the food processor along with the cauliflower cooking liquid, then add flavor to the mixture with vegan mayonnaise (homemade or store-bought), nutritional yeast, mustard, garlic powder, and lemon juice. Add the artichokes and cooked spinach, pulse until combined, and it's ready to be baked until browned and bubbling.

For the BOSH! Balls: Preheat the oven to 180℃. Place the oats, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, coconut and pecan on a baking sheet and toast for 5- 10 minutes. Set aside and allow to cool. Place the dates, cinnamon, maple syrup, salt and vanilla in a food processor and puree. Remove and add to a mixing bowl. Add the cooled toasted oats, seeds and nuts and the chopped chocolate. Mix well together using your hands or a wooden spoon.


For your convenience, we've compiled a list of premade snacks and recipes below that do not include any animal products, whether it be cheese or honey. We do, however, have some “cheesy” snacks on the list including vegan “cheese” kale chips and vegan “cheese” dill chips. Both of these vegan snacks use nutritional yeast to recreate that uniquely “cheesy” flavor.
Following a vegetarian diet is a healthy lifestyle choice that is associated with lower rates of obesity and better cardiovascular health (American Heart Association, 2015). However, vegetarians must be vigilant about their dietary intake to ensure they get the broad array of nutrients needed to maintain health. Meat and animal products are a good source of certain nutrients that are less abundant in non-animal sources. In particular, it is important for vegetarians to prioritize getting the following nutrients:
But first, a bit of definition: "Free foods," in my opinion, are those that have 25 calories or less per reasonable serving. "Almost free foods" have 25 to 60 calories per reasonable serving. Portion control is key here. While 2 cups of popped, 94% fat-free microwave popcorn may contain only 40 calories, if you eat the entire bag you'll end up with closer to 200 calories -- definitely not an "almost free" food situation.
That is, until it's snack time—then, if you're on the keto diet, your'e basically SOL (unless, you know, you like having an entire steak for a snack). Think about it: All the best snacks are off limits on the keto diet (damn that fickle 70 percent fat, 25 percent protein, 5 percent carbs ratio). Granola bars, crackers, cookies—all off-limits on a keto diet.
Vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is exclusively found in animal products (Office of Dietary Supplements, 2016). This vitamin is important for red blood cell formation and metabolic processes. Non-vegan vegetarians may obtain vitamin B12 from eggs, milk, or other dairy products. Vegans may need a dietary supplement to get enough, although breakfast cereals and other products are sometimes fortified with the vitamin.
That same vegan nacho cheese sauce makes for a serious plate of nachos. We use freshly fried tortilla wedges (they're sturdier than store-bought chips) as the base for vegan refried beans and chili, Roasted-Tomato Salsa, guacamole, and tons of fresh and pickled veggies. Layering the chips and toppings for even coverage is a little extra work, but it's worth it for the many more balanced bites you'll get.
Can snacking be a part of a healthy diet? Of course! When you choose a snack, choose one with protein, fat and/or fiber. All of these nutrients take longer to digest, so they fill you up. Snacks are also a great way to add extra nutrition to your day. Think of snacks like carrots and hummus, an apple with almond butter or whole-grain crackers with cheese.

Going vegan doesn't mean you don't get to eat snacks. You may be wondering what you can snack on in between meals, late at night, or just when you're out and about and on the go. There's plenty to choose from. You don't have to just eat carrot sticks, although, with a bit of hummus or some vegan ranch dressing, veggies are fantastic healthy vegan snacks.
Ditch the store-bought granola brands (which are often packed with artificial ingredients) for this delicious DIY bar. Made with chunks of dried apple, pecans, toasted oats and cinnamon, each bite will satisfy your apple pie cravings. The other good news is that it serves up only five grams of sugar. Make a batch ahead of time and then stash some in your desk so you’ll always have something to nosh on. Photo and recipe: Carmen Sturdy / Life by Daily Burn
Did I have you at cheesecake? Made with frozen berries and cottage cheese (which IS indeed keto-friendly), you get the cheesecake taste in a glass with this clever recipe from Lindsay Cotter, the woman behind the gluten-free-dedicated blog Cotter Crunch. You can also cut way back on the sugar by using Stevia or xylitol syrup as a sweetener. Simply add berries, almonds, coconut milk, cashew cream or cottage cheese (for the cheesecake part), and a dash of cinnamon to a blender, and blend until smooth. Pour into cups and enjoy!
Bust out your slow cooker and make some chili. A pot of chili will last you all week long and is perfect for any season and for any meal. Vegan chili is super easy; all you need are some spices, a couple cans of beans, and simple vegetables like corn, onion, and tomatoes. Chili is adaptable and tastes super with other ingredients like beer or sweet potatoes. This Three Bean and Sweet Potato Chili is a vegan wonder as you just need to add your ingredients and let them simmer. Same goes for this Sweet and Spicy Pumpkin Chili. Chili also makes for an extraordinary make-ahead meal. For the more adventurous, add some vegan sour cream or cheese for an extra indulgence. To use up those leftover pantry goods, this Frito Chili Pie is an American bar-food staple that definitely suits a lazy vegan lifestyle. For more slow cooker ideas beyond chili, try using protein-packed lentils in stews and soups.
If you're looking for a creative way to add more fruit to your diet, try frozen banana pops. Slice several peeled bananas in half and insert popsicle sticks. Coat each half with an ounce of low-fat plain yogurt. Put the pops in the freezer, and soon you'll have ready-to-eat low-calorie treats. At just under 80 calories a pop, this is a snack you can feel good about.
Not really corn but that’s what the blogger to the original recipe (linked below) called it so I’ll stick with that. That was my first time trying the Field Roast frankfurters. Usually I don’t buy shit from the hippie section because of my lame soy sensitivity but I need to start looking more because these are soy free options (no one cares) there once I really looked. These very much inspire me to want to step up my seitan game. I like making lazy, flavorless seitan but I think it would be in my best interest to at least know how to recreate these. Total game changer!
Oatmeal is a complex carb, meaning it helps fill you up without spiking your blood sugar. Plus, it's a good source of fiber and eating more fiber helps people lose weight and keep it off. While we think of it typically as breakfast, a small bowl of oats makes a hearty, filling and delicious snack. To make this snack more convenient-keep a packet or two of unsweetened instant oatmeal at your desk or make overnight oats in a mason jar.
Oh man, it’s already worth making baked pears just because of how great the kitchen smells when you shove them in the oven. They’re so easily prepared too: Slice a pear in half, scoop out the pit with a spoon. Now add a couple of walnuts, sprinkle cinnamon over them and drizzle maple syrup or honey (for non-vegans) on top. Off they go in the oven for about 25 minutes on 380°F/180°C.
Get off that couch and make yourself some dinner! With these five meal ideas you sure won’t be in the kitchen for long, and you’ll satisfy your hungry belly with nutrients and finger-licking, vegan goodness. With a little creativity, any meal can be nourishing made with ingredients you have on hand. For all you lazy vegans out there, do you have a favorite meal idea or recipe? Share your thoughts, we would love to hear from you!
Although fall is the synonymous season of pumpkin EVERYTHING, if you’re on the keto diet, you shouldn’t skip pumpkin seeds. They’re loaded with healthy fats and protein, and this smoky snack only has four simple ingredients. Get the recipe from DeSantis here, which uses smoked paprika, garlic powder, sea salt, and your choice of oil (for more healthy fat!).

Popcorn is high in fiber and even delivers a little protein. A 1-ounce serving (about 3 cups) of air-popped popcorn has 4 grams of fiber, almost 4 grams of protein and clocks in at 110 calories. This combination makes it a snack with staying power. Popcorn is actually a whole grain and 3 cups is a huge serving-especially when you compare it to other crunchy, salty snacks like chips. Many companies are making bagged popcorn, see our favorite healthy popcorn picks.
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