Following a vegetarian diet is a healthy lifestyle choice that is associated with lower rates of obesity and better cardiovascular health (American Heart Association, 2015). However, vegetarians must be vigilant about their dietary intake to ensure they get the broad array of nutrients needed to maintain health. Meat and animal products are a good source of certain nutrients that are less abundant in non-animal sources. In particular, it is important for vegetarians to prioritize getting the following nutrients:
Skip the typical pasta and sauce and make some super Easy Peanut Noodles. You’ll most likely have all the ingredients you need on hand. Peanut noodles taste divine, make fantastic leftovers and are superbly filling. For any peanut butter lover like myself, peanut noodles make an outstanding savory meal and they’re high in protein! Try these Noodles With Peanut-Miso Sauce and feel free to swap out the kelp noodles for noodles of your choice. For the lazy cook, make a large batch of Zucchini Noodles and use them sporadically throughout the week. These raw noodles would taste fresh and zesty with a peanut sauce. For the sauce, make sure to add miso to it as this will provide luxurious tastes and that umami flavor we all crave.
Sizzle up a slice of this breakfast favorite for a savory protein boost—so long as you think you can cut yourself off after a slice or two. Recent research has found that processed meats, such as hot dogs and bacon, are carcinogenic to humans, however eating the stuff in moderation isn't a major risk, say diet experts. The more you eat, the higher your risk of disease.
This fresh seasonal salad is ridiculously easy to put together and quite versatile. Serve our suggested amount as a side salad with grilled steak, chicken, or fish, or eat a double portion as a main dish. You can also stick with the serving size listed here and add canned oil-packed tuna or sliced rotisserie chicken breast for a filling lunch. Leftovers fare well as is, tucked into tacos, or added to whole-grain salad bowls.
These cookies are so guilt-free you can even eat them in the a.m. Combine almonds, walnuts, flax and a few other good-for-you ingredients to form bite-size bowls you can fill with almond milk, Greek yogurt or seasonal berries. Pop one in your mouth for just 184 calories — and feel your hunger melt away. Photo and recipe: Alexa Schirm / Life by Daily Burn
While chili may seem like a main dish, a small scoop of this keto variety can provide you enough protein (almost 3 grams!) to keep you going. "Use an Instant Pot for great fast cooking," says Suzanne Ryan, author of Beyond Simply Keto. To make it, brown your ground beef and sausage, saving half the fat drippings. Chop one green bell pepper and ½ onion. Pour meat, fat, veggies, canned ingredients and spices into your instant pot, and cook for 40 minutes. (This is also a great keto meal-prep recipe to have on hand.)
If you need your snack to have real staying power, go for a combo of good protein and a little bit of fat. A homemade egg salad is a great choice. Chop up one whole egg and one egg white, then mix with a tablespoon of reduced-fat mayonnaise. The high-quality protein in the eggs will fuel your body for hours, while the fat helps slow digestion, so you'll feel full and energized longer.
Every diet begins with watching what you eat. Counting calories is key whether you're maintaining a healthy weight or working to shed a few pounds. Fortunately, there's an easier way to go about the math than tracking down nutritional info and logging every bite: build a strong portfolio of delicious low-calorie meals and let it do the work for you. We'll get you started with this collection of vegan recipes that are short on calories but big on flavor. The only arithmetic you'll be responsible for is subtracting pounds.
Dried fruit is a portable, healthy snack. Eating fruit helps with weight-loss because it's packed with filling fiber (and important vitamins and minerals). Look for fruit with no sugar or sweeteners added and pair dried fruit with nuts for a snack with a balance of healthy carbs and protein. Dried fruit is also a great option to keep at your desk at work.
Like olive oil, olives are filled with healthy monounsaturated fats that boost heart health and ward off hunger. With just 50 calories for an entire to-go pack, you can't go wrong with Milas Oloves' savory, citrus- and herb-infused snack. Though they're sold at a number of health food stores, most Starbucks locations recently started carrying them (along with some other new healthy snacks), so they're easy to find in a pinch.
Protein: Studies show that women are less likely to munch mindlessly when they include protein in meals and snacks. For reasons not entirely understood, protein makes your belly feel full longer, and research suggests you're less likely to crave treats when you're satisfied. We've designed the diet to give you extra protein in simple forms — like a hardcooked egg or nuts — throughout the day.
Need to use up some leftover ingredients? Make a pita pizza! Don’t fret about making the dough, that’s what whole grain pita bread is for. While pita bread makes filling and tasty sandwiches, it’s also a great base for loading toppings on. Whole grain pita bread is typically high in protein and fiber, and it’s ideal for the lazy vegan because it’s already cooked for you! Pita pizza is also awesome because it’s just the right size for one person. Start with pita bread, spread on some sauce, add some non-dairy cheese, and pile on any vegetables you have on hand. This Vegan Pepper Jack Cashew Cheese is my favorite as it will add some spice to your Homemade Pita Bread. For an easy fix, use store-bought vegan cheese like Daiya or Tofutti. Mushrooms, tomatoes, spinach or broccoli are healthy options for vegetable toppings, and many of these can come frozen or from a jar. Check out this Ultimate Guide to Making Homemade Pizza and simply use a pita for the base. After assembled, pop your pita in an oven at 425 degrees for 8-10 minutes and you’ve got yourself a quick and wholesome meal.
A mini-meal snack is a good idea when dinner is a long way off. The combo of tomato soup and baby carrots is not just filling; it also gives you lots of body-healthy nutrients, like potassium, cancer-fighting lycopene, and beta-carotene. Try a microwavable soup cup that you can stash in your car's cup holder. (Concerned about sodium? Pour about a quarter of the soup down the drain and dilute the rest with water, says McLachlan.)
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