I want to make fermented cheeses though and will be experimenting a lot. I did recently use sunflower seeds in a recipe for cashew cheese (who can afford cashews these days!) and it turned out amazingly cheezy. I was making a quiche but the texture of the quiche was off (I only had extra firm tofu) and although it was really tasty, it wasn’t a huge success. I didn’t want to waste it so I boshed the quiche (I made it crustless) into a large batch of bechamel sauce that I was making for a vegan lasagna and it made the sauce AMAZING. Here’s the sunflower seed recipe if you want. I do have a vitamix blender (prehistoric from WAY back last century when we worked) but I am quite sure as the sunflower seeds are soaked, that you could get away with a cheaper blender or food processor, just let it run for a bit. Hope you like it. It tastes really cheesy.
Ah, i need to make some chz but I’m not sure when. The cheese I have on my mind is tapioca based. Definitely need a soy free cheese because I doubt Mark will eat it (or eat much of it). Its funny because if I make something soy based he’ll eat it so I don’t have to. But if I make vegan cheese he often doesn’t. At least if it has a bunch of nutritional yeast he’ll avoid it.
I don’t use nutritional yeast any more. It’s like $20 a bag full here in Tasmania (that’s IF you can find it in the first place). I made a tapioca based cheese and it sat in the fridge as Steve wasn’t keen on it but then in my “waste not want not” phase, I decided to throw it into a batch of bechamel and again, it was amazing. Sometimes it’s not the product that is wonderful but how you can use it that matters. We can’t get Follow your heart products here (heck, we don’t even have Earth Balance!) but I have found several interesting starch based egg replacement products on the net (recipes for how to make). The best vegan quiche we ever made was based on chickpea flour so I guess it really is horses for courses.
Though avocado toast has become something of a cliché, it's popular for a reason—a slice of hearty toast spread with creamy avocado, drizzled with a bit of olive oil, and sprinkled with salt makes a simple, filling, and tasty snack (or breakfast!). If you need a little more excitement than what the basic formula offers, we've got plenty of different ways to give it a twist. One of our favorites is this bright vegan version, which gets its springtime vibe from sweet baby peas, slivers of crisp radish, and fresh basil.
Ah, i need to make some chz but I’m not sure when. The cheese I have on my mind is tapioca based. Definitely need a soy free cheese because I doubt Mark will eat it (or eat much of it). Its funny because if I make something soy based he’ll eat it so I don’t have to. But if I make vegan cheese he often doesn’t. At least if it has a bunch of nutritional yeast he’ll avoid it.

Every diet begins with watching what you eat. Counting calories is key whether you're maintaining a healthy weight or working to shed a few pounds. Fortunately, there's an easier way to go about the math than tracking down nutritional info and logging every bite: build a strong portfolio of delicious low-calorie meals and let it do the work for you. We'll get you started with this collection of vegan recipes that are short on calories but big on flavor. The only arithmetic you'll be responsible for is subtracting pounds.
It's easy to see why pistachios ranked as one of the best nuts for weight loss, they've helped countless Biggest Loser contestants trim down. "We keep pistachios in ample supply at the ranch, says Biggest Loser dietitian Cheryl Forberg, RD. "Not only are they a satisfying, heart-healthy snack, they also aid weight loss. Studies suggest having to manually remove the shell helps people eat more mindfully and slows the rate at which they nosh, helping to reduce portion size and calorie intake, she explains"
Following a vegetarian diet is a healthy lifestyle choice that is associated with lower rates of obesity and better cardiovascular health (American Heart Association, 2015). However, vegetarians must be vigilant about their dietary intake to ensure they get the broad array of nutrients needed to maintain health. Meat and animal products are a good source of certain nutrients that are less abundant in non-animal sources. In particular, it is important for vegetarians to prioritize getting the following nutrients:
Wine, however, is Alyce’s favourite “snack”. There is a myth out there that alcohol is very calorific which is not strictly true. I think for the fun these calories provide, they are well worth it. Stcik to a small glass (120 – 130 mls) and check the alcohol content of the bottle you’re drinking. The higher the alcohol quantity, the more calories it has. Red wine (generally) has more alcohol than white, chardonnay has more alcohol than sauvignon blanc.
Every diet begins with watching what you eat. Counting calories is key whether you're maintaining a healthy weight or working to shed a few pounds. Fortunately, there's an easier way to go about the math than tracking down nutritional info and logging every bite: build a strong portfolio of delicious low-calorie meals and let it do the work for you. We'll get you started with this collection of vegan recipes that are short on calories but big on flavor. The only arithmetic you'll be responsible for is subtracting pounds.

It's as simple a snack recipe as can be, but unusually satisfying: For a twist on plain homemade popcorn, try drizzling it with olive oil and sprinkling it with za'atar, the heady Middle Eastern spice blend of oregano, thyme, sesame seeds, and tart sumac. You can check out all our popcorn flavors here, including Thai coconut curry, miso soup, and roast chicken dinner; those three are vegan if you swap out the butter.


Can snacking be a part of a healthy diet? Of course! When you choose a snack, choose one with protein, fat and/or fiber. All of these nutrients take longer to digest, so they fill you up. Snacks are also a great way to add extra nutrition to your day. Think of snacks like carrots and hummus, an apple with almond butter or whole-grain crackers with cheese.
But first, a bit of definition: "Free foods," in my opinion, are those that have 25 calories or less per reasonable serving. "Almost free foods" have 25 to 60 calories per reasonable serving. Portion control is key here. While 2 cups of popped, 94% fat-free microwave popcorn may contain only 40 calories, if you eat the entire bag you'll end up with closer to 200 calories -- definitely not an "almost free" food situation.

This colorful creation makes for a festive appetizer or a delicious bite-sized snack. Thanks to the zucchini base, they're loaded with vitamin A, magnesium, omega-3 fatty acids, zinc, calcium, and protein, just to name a few of its many nutrients. Plus the sun-dried tomato adds a dose of vitamin, iron, and antioxidants. While the goat cheese adds a boost of protein to keep you feeling full and satisfied longer.
Eating snacks with the right ratio of nutrients, with the right calories, will help keep your body energized and help you lose weight. Protein (plus exercise) fuels the growth of lean muscle mass, which boosts metabolic rate and increases calorie burn. Fiber, meanwhile, helps improve digestion and keeps you from binging on fats and sugars. So while there's no food that will literally "burn fat" while you eat it, smart choices with these ingredients will help your body operate at maximum efficiency. Bowerman suggests snacks under 200 calories, with 10 grams of protein and close to 5 grams of fiber. Here are 22 of our favorite healthy snacks.
Chocolate-topped digestive biscuits from brands like McVitie's are great candidates for veganizing. Here, we rely on toasted sugar to provide depth of flavor in the absence of lactose, and use coconut oil to make a dairy-free dough that's easy to handle. A blend of all-purpose and whole wheat flour supplies the right combination of toasty flavor and crisp-yet-tender texture. Top with the high-quality vegan chocolate of your choice.
I love that you have so many bowls of things! Those are my favorite–and I’m really lazy, so I go across the street to Whole Foods and pick up cooked rice/other carby thing, pre-cut or steamed vegetables, some beans or tofu, and I’m set for lunch or dinner. Breakfast is another bowl–fruit, some homemade granola (or crumbled up cookies…) and Kite Hill yogurt.
Need to use up some leftover ingredients? Make a pita pizza! Don’t fret about making the dough, that’s what whole grain pita bread is for. While pita bread makes filling and tasty sandwiches, it’s also a great base for loading toppings on. Whole grain pita bread is typically high in protein and fiber, and it’s ideal for the lazy vegan because it’s already cooked for you! Pita pizza is also awesome because it’s just the right size for one person. Start with pita bread, spread on some sauce, add some non-dairy cheese, and pile on any vegetables you have on hand. This Vegan Pepper Jack Cashew Cheese is my favorite as it will add some spice to your Homemade Pita Bread. For an easy fix, use store-bought vegan cheese like Daiya or Tofutti. Mushrooms, tomatoes, spinach or broccoli are healthy options for vegetable toppings, and many of these can come frozen or from a jar. Check out this Ultimate Guide to Making Homemade Pizza and simply use a pita for the base. After assembled, pop your pita in an oven at 425 degrees for 8-10 minutes and you’ve got yourself a quick and wholesome meal.

Sizzle up a slice of this breakfast favorite for a savory protein boost—so long as you think you can cut yourself off after a slice or two. Recent research has found that processed meats, such as hot dogs and bacon, are carcinogenic to humans, however eating the stuff in moderation isn't a major risk, say diet experts. The more you eat, the higher your risk of disease.

For a savory snack under 60 calories, spread 1 tablespoon of low-fat cream cheese onto a slice of smoked salmon (lox) and roll it up. This salmon pinwheel is high in protein and heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, though the salt used to cure the salmon boosts the sodium content. Use a little less cream cheese and you can have two pinwheels for under 100 calories.


For a sweet fix, try mixing mandarin oranges canned in their own juice with a couple tablespoons of light whipped topping. The oranges give a great hit of vitamin C and other antioxidants, and the light whipped topping gives the snack an indulgent feel (a feeling you often miss when you're watching what you eat). "This is a good substitute for ice cream when you're dieting," adds McLachlan.
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