This fresh seasonal salad is ridiculously easy to put together and quite versatile. Serve our suggested amount as a side salad with grilled steak, chicken, or fish, or eat a double portion as a main dish. You can also stick with the serving size listed here and add canned oil-packed tuna or sliced rotisserie chicken breast for a filling lunch. Leftovers fare well as is, tucked into tacos, or added to whole-grain salad bowls.

I want to make fermented cheeses though and will be experimenting a lot. I did recently use sunflower seeds in a recipe for cashew cheese (who can afford cashews these days!) and it turned out amazingly cheezy. I was making a quiche but the texture of the quiche was off (I only had extra firm tofu) and although it was really tasty, it wasn’t a huge success. I didn’t want to waste it so I boshed the quiche (I made it crustless) into a large batch of bechamel sauce that I was making for a vegan lasagna and it made the sauce AMAZING. Here’s the sunflower seed recipe if you want. I do have a vitamix blender (prehistoric from WAY back last century when we worked) but I am quite sure as the sunflower seeds are soaked, that you could get away with a cheaper blender or food processor, just let it run for a bit. Hope you like it. It tastes really cheesy.

It's easy enough to find vegan snacks; after all, things like store-bought hummus, fruit, and some crackers come that way naturally. But when a real craving hits, we tend to want something packed with tons of flavor—like a sweet-and-sour eggplant caponata for dipping, a batch of hearty homemade Wheat Thins, or a piece of avocado toast that's gussied up with sweet baby peas and spicy radishes. Because there's a time and a place for everything, including junky snacks, we also have recipes for saucy Korean-style fried cauliflower and fully loaded nachos covered in a vegan queso-style sauce. Keep reading for 18 of our favorite vegan snacks that will fend off any attack.

This CL-perfected stovetop technique makes smoking food easier than ever (though the salad is still tasty if you choose not to smoke the grains), and smoke is such a fun flavor to apply to unexpected ingredients like barley. A sweet vinaigrette, earthy beets, and the intense citrus twang of grapefruit balance the robust smoky hit of the grains for a memorable salad. To make sure you're getting the whole-grain version of barley, look for hulled, and skip past pearled.


It's easy enough to find vegan snacks; after all, things like store-bought hummus, fruit, and some crackers come that way naturally. But when a real craving hits, we tend to want something packed with tons of flavor—like a sweet-and-sour eggplant caponata for dipping, a batch of hearty homemade Wheat Thins, or a piece of avocado toast that's gussied up with sweet baby peas and spicy radishes. Because there's a time and a place for everything, including junky snacks, we also have recipes for saucy Korean-style fried cauliflower and fully loaded nachos covered in a vegan queso-style sauce. Keep reading for 18 of our favorite vegan snacks that will fend off any attack.
Fat cells fear fruit—especially watermelon. At less than 50 calories per cup and 90 percent water by weight, the summer staple is almost impossible to eat too much of. What's more, noshing on the juicy fruit has been shown to increase blood levels of L-arginine, an amino acid that's kryptonite for belly fat. One group of women who supplemented with L-arginine dropped an average of 6.5 pounds and two inches from their waists in just 12 weeks, according to a recent study. Add the fruit to your weekly lineup to reap the benefits, or pair it with one of these other best fruits for fat loss for a more filling snack.
That is, until it's snack time—then, if you're on the keto diet, your'e basically SOL (unless, you know, you like having an entire steak for a snack). Think about it: All the best snacks are off limits on the keto diet (damn that fickle 70 percent fat, 25 percent protein, 5 percent carbs ratio). Granola bars, crackers, cookies—all off-limits on a keto diet.
Before you sit down to watch Empire, grab a small bowl of this skinny snack. We love SkinnyPop because it's free of additives and exceptionally tasty—without being too salty. Though we're partial to the Original flavor, the popcorn also comes in equally low-cal flavors like white cheddar and kettle corn if you're in the mood to mix it up. Just a few changes to your diet like this can mean big weight loss.
Every diet begins with watching what you eat. Counting calories is key whether you're maintaining a healthy weight or working to shed a few pounds. Fortunately, there's an easier way to go about the math than tracking down nutritional info and logging every bite: build a strong portfolio of delicious low-calorie meals and let it do the work for you. We'll get you started with this collection of vegan recipes that are short on calories but big on flavor. The only arithmetic you'll be responsible for is subtracting pounds.
“You might assume that you can’t eat pulses like chickpeas, beans, and lentils on the keto diet. But you totally can, especially in smaller portions," says Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in the New York City area. "Pulses are a good source of satiating protein and an excellent source of filling fiber—and research shows that eating them daily can help your overall health and can even help you lose weight." Roast chickpeas and toss with oil (for added fat) and spices (to amp the flavor).
This portable, affordable protein is a must-eat for anyone looking to lose a few. Why? Canned tuna is a prime source of a specific omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which has been shown to "turn off" fat genes in the abdomen, preventing belly fat cells from growing larger. To keep calories to a minimum, skip the mayo and instead add a few cranks of ground pepper, a splash of balsamic vinegar and serve the fish over a bed of greens—super filling, yet low-cal.

More than 7 million Americans identify as vegetarian, while another 22.8 million follow a largely vegetarian diet (Vegetarian Times, n.d.). Whether you are a dedicated vegetarian or an omnivore exploring healthier meat-free options, getting the right balance of nutrients is essential. Snacking is a healthy part of any diet, making it important to choose vegetarian snacks that satisfy your hunger while meeting your unique nutritional needs.


Don't let the high fat content in pistachios scare you off -- most of the fat is unsaturated or "good" fat. Eat 20 pistachios, and you'll only take in 80 calories and less than a gram of saturated fat. Plus, they're rich in protein, fiber, and several key vitamins and minerals. To avoid an unhealthy dose of sodium, eat them raw or dry roasted without salt.
Can snacking be a part of a healthy diet? Of course! When you choose a snack, choose one with protein, fat and/or fiber. All of these nutrients take longer to digest, so they fill you up. Snacks are also a great way to add extra nutrition to your day. Think of snacks like carrots and hummus, an apple with almond butter or whole-grain crackers with cheese.

Good snacks are also relatively portable and easy to eat while you’re on the go. Search for snack ideas that can be thrown into your purse or bag, giving you the ability to always have food on hand. Additionally, a good snack is one that can be made ahead of time. For example, a trail mix that contains mixed nuts, dried fruits, and a small amount of chocolate provides a great balance of nutrients. You can portion a large bag of trail mix into smaller, snack-sized portions at the beginning of the week. Then, simply stick one in your bag before you head out the door to avoid mid-afternoon cravings.
According to experts, snacking in between meals wards off hunger and aids weight loss by maintaining blood-sugar levels and reducing blood insulin levels. "When your body produces less insulin, you're much less likely to convert dietary calories into body fat," says weight loss expert Dr. Wayne Scott Andersen. "If we feed the body at regular intervals we send a signal to the body that it doesn't have to store calories," he adds.

This classic Sicilian eggplant dish, terrific as a spread, a dip, or a pasta sauce, is proof positive that vegan food doesn't have to be bland. The sweet-and-sour mixture packs in all sorts of intense flavors, including pine nuts, mint, raisins, capers, and vinegar. Even with the long ingredient list, it's not that hard to make: By cooking the ingredients in a particular order, we've engineered this recipe to use just one skillet.


Three words: So. Freakin'. Good. While eating something made solely of dehydrated squash and a bunch of spices may not seem like it would be tasty, Just Pure Foods dazzles us with this healthy chip alternative creation. It's crispy and full of an oniony, garlicky flavor that's hard to stop eating. Best of all, you don't have to. Even if you were to polish off half the bag in one sitting, it won't do much damage to your waistline.
Where I live, in Sydney, Australia, there is a sushi shop on every corner. Sushi is always cheap, fresh and readily available. However, if you live in a place where sushi is difficult to come by, simply make your own. Most good Asian grocery shops stock everything you’ll need: sushi rice, nori paper, wasabi, mirin, soy sauce and cucumber. The rice should be made with vinegar and sugar. Limit your portion to approximately 30 grams of dry rice – not much.
One cup sliced cucumbers and 10 large olives makes for a great keto-friendly snack, with added benefits: “This is a great snack to help people in ketosis supplement their sodium levels." says Desiree Nielsen, RD, author of Un-Junk Your Diet. When you're in ketosis, your body needs more sodium, and “without adequate sodium, people are at risk for dehydration, constipation, and more dangerous electrolyte imbalances," she adds.

Chocolate-topped digestive biscuits from brands like McVitie's are great candidates for veganizing. Here, we rely on toasted sugar to provide depth of flavor in the absence of lactose, and use coconut oil to make a dairy-free dough that's easy to handle. A blend of all-purpose and whole wheat flour supplies the right combination of toasty flavor and crisp-yet-tender texture. Top with the high-quality vegan chocolate of your choice.
For a savory snack under 60 calories, spread 1 tablespoon of low-fat cream cheese onto a slice of smoked salmon (lox) and roll it up. This salmon pinwheel is high in protein and heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, though the salt used to cure the salmon boosts the sodium content. Use a little less cream cheese and you can have two pinwheels for under 100 calories.
These are perfect keto snacks alone, but they’re even tastier together, says Boise, Idaho-based dietitian Emily Norbryhn, RD, who often works with keto clients. “The fat, protein, and fiber in this snack will keep you full for hours,” she adds. Mix together two tablespoons crea\my almond butter, one teaspoon chia seeds, one teaspoon sunflower seeds, one teaspoon flax seeds, and two teaspoons pumpkin seeds. Dig in.

Instead of meaty mushrooms, this vegetarian pâté relies on nutty pecans and the deep umami flavor of roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for butter and cream to get a smooth consistency, but you can easily replace those ingredients with oil and vegetable stock in the same quantities. The result is a dip that's slightly less pâté-like, but just as tasty.


There are simple tricks to help out any lazy cook with making meals. The most important trick is to keep lots of spices and sauces in your kitchen. Spices like turmeric, black pepper and sea salt, cinnamon and cayenne pepper are sure to pair well with most plant-based ingredients. These Chipotle Vegetable Stuffed Avocados are flavored with …yup, you guessed it: chipotle. Sauces like teriyaki, soy, mustard and balsamic are great starters in marinades for plant-protein sources like tofu, beans or tempeh. Another trick for the lazy cook is to use basic, yet satisfying ingredients. This means straying away from processed foods and choosing fresh or frozen vegetables and grains instead. Here are some of the best meal ideas that would suit any lazy chef. These ideas are economical, hearty, vegan-friendly, and best of all, don’t require your whole night in the kitchen.
Protein: Studies show that women are less likely to munch mindlessly when they include protein in meals and snacks. For reasons not entirely understood, protein makes your belly feel full longer, and research suggests you're less likely to crave treats when you're satisfied. We've designed the diet to give you extra protein in simple forms — like a hardcooked egg or nuts — throughout the day.
Skip the typical pasta and sauce and make some super Easy Peanut Noodles. You’ll most likely have all the ingredients you need on hand. Peanut noodles taste divine, make fantastic leftovers and are superbly filling. For any peanut butter lover like myself, peanut noodles make an outstanding savory meal and they’re high in protein! Try these Noodles With Peanut-Miso Sauce and feel free to swap out the kelp noodles for noodles of your choice. For the lazy cook, make a large batch of Zucchini Noodles and use them sporadically throughout the week. These raw noodles would taste fresh and zesty with a peanut sauce. For the sauce, make sure to add miso to it as this will provide luxurious tastes and that umami flavor we all crave.
This gourmet treat is an awesome balanced and satisfying snack. The pumpernickel toast lends fiber to help keep your belly full until your next meal. While the salmon boasts high levels of omega-3 fatty acids, protein, B vitamins, potassium, and selenium. Plus, these tasty toasts include a horseradish spread for just the right amount of flavor kick. The best part: They take less than 10 minutes to make!
Where I live, in Sydney, Australia, there is a sushi shop on every corner. Sushi is always cheap, fresh and readily available. However, if you live in a place where sushi is difficult to come by, simply make your own. Most good Asian grocery shops stock everything you’ll need: sushi rice, nori paper, wasabi, mirin, soy sauce and cucumber. The rice should be made with vinegar and sugar. Limit your portion to approximately 30 grams of dry rice – not much.

Ditch the store-bought granola brands (which are often packed with artificial ingredients) for this delicious DIY bar. Made with chunks of dried apple, pecans, toasted oats and cinnamon, each bite will satisfy your apple pie cravings. The other good news is that it serves up only five grams of sugar. Make a batch ahead of time and then stash some in your desk so you’ll always have something to nosh on. Photo and recipe: Carmen Sturdy / Life by Daily Burn


Who doesn’t love a good snack? They’re essential for staving off hunger between meals and keeping you fueled from your early morning workout until your late night dinner with friends. But small bites can also be a nutritional trap, providing few nutrients and tons of unnecessary calories. A 2012 study examining the diets of nearly 5,000 adults found that almost a third of their daily calorie intake was from “empty,” or nutritionally void, snack calories.
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