When fall comes around and you have more apples than you can reasonably eat out of hand, this recipe is here to help you preserve their flavor (especially if you freeze the applesauce for the off-season). Apple cider vinegar helps to brighten up the cooked fruit, while leaving the skins on the apples contributes flavor and color. Because roses belong to the same family as apples, a few drops of rosewater will help intensify the fruit's flavor. Try our apple compote, too, for an elegant (and quicker-cooking) dessert.
Don't let the high fat content in pistachios scare you off -- most of the fat is unsaturated or "good" fat. Eat 20 pistachios, and you'll only take in 80 calories and less than a gram of saturated fat. Plus, they're rich in protein, fiber, and several key vitamins and minerals. To avoid an unhealthy dose of sodium, eat them raw or dry roasted without salt.
Make a big batch of this soup and have a cup each afternoon. It’s packed with fiber and gingery flavor that will keep your stomach satiated for hours! Plus this carrot-ginger soup is packed with antioxidants. And since carrots are rich in vitamin A, this healthy snack may also reduce the risk of heart attacks, protect vision, and lower the risk of getting certain cancers. One serving weighs in at a little over 100 calories and 7 grams of waist-slimming fiber.
Most orange vegetables and fruits, like oranges, are spiked with carotenoids—fat-soluble compounds that are associated with a reduction of a wide range of cancers, as well as reduced risk and severity of inflammatory conditions such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. Oranges are also packed with Vitamin C, a nutrient that lowers levels of cortisol, a hormone linked to belly fat storage.
They're mini health packets. Fresh herbs are calorie-free and loaded with antioxidants and other healthy ingredients. Basil and mint contain compounds that are potential cancer fighters; rosemary may help fight memory loss; and cilantro appears to slow the growth of certain bacteria that cause food-borne illness. Herbs are also a viable source of vitamins: 2 tablespoons of fresh basil, for example, delivers 27 percent of your recommended daily quotient of vitamin K, and just a handful of chives provides 10 percent of your daily requirement for vitamins A and C.
We combine everything you love about Chinese takeout—the sweet, savory, spicy sauce; the super-crispy tofu; and the crisp-tender, perfectly caramelized vegetables—into one quick vegetarian main. Celery takes on a leading role rather than a base ingredient here: It maintains its crunch, adds a natural saltiness, and is a nice foil to the more robust flavors in the dish. Szechuan here refers to the stir-fry method rather than a tingling, chile-laden heat. If you want more spice, swap the crushed red pepper for one or two very thinly sliced Thai red chiles.
Most orange vegetables and fruits, like oranges, are spiked with carotenoids—fat-soluble compounds that are associated with a reduction of a wide range of cancers, as well as reduced risk and severity of inflammatory conditions such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. Oranges are also packed with Vitamin C, a nutrient that lowers levels of cortisol, a hormone linked to belly fat storage.
They're mini health packets. Fresh herbs are calorie-free and loaded with antioxidants and other healthy ingredients. Basil and mint contain compounds that are potential cancer fighters; rosemary may help fight memory loss; and cilantro appears to slow the growth of certain bacteria that cause food-borne illness. Herbs are also a viable source of vitamins: 2 tablespoons of fresh basil, for example, delivers 27 percent of your recommended daily quotient of vitamin K, and just a handful of chives provides 10 percent of your daily requirement for vitamins A and C.
Known for being a cheap staple, rice and beans is a classic lazy person’s meal that’s also good for you! Brown rice is packed with hardy nutrients and can be made in large batches to last for a few days worth of meals. If you don’t have the time to cook rice on the stove, opt for using instant. Although the texture will be different, this is still a healthier option for the time-crunched than processed foods and breads. Beans make a killer counterpart to rice as they are incredibly cheap and will keep you full for hours. Black beans, kidney beans, chickpeas or black-eyed peas are all quality options and are easy because you can buy them in a can. Make sure to rinse them well before using. Check out this White Bean Wild Rice Hash or this Cilantro, Lime and Black Bean Rice for either a side dish or a main course, and see Easy Ways to Spruce Up Classic Rice and Beans for more help to those feeling lackadaisical.
It's easy enough to find vegan snacks; after all, things like store-bought hummus, fruit, and some crackers come that way naturally. But when a real craving hits, we tend to want something packed with tons of flavor—like a sweet-and-sour eggplant caponata for dipping, a batch of hearty homemade Wheat Thins, or a piece of avocado toast that's gussied up with sweet baby peas and spicy radishes. Because there's a time and a place for everything, including junky snacks, we also have recipes for saucy Korean-style fried cauliflower and fully loaded nachos covered in a vegan queso-style sauce. Keep reading for 18 of our favorite vegan snacks that will fend off any attack.
Can’t get enough fall flavors in your life? You’ll dig these bite sized treats. (Plus, did you know pumpkin is a great source of vitamin A?) Cranberries add a dash of tart and fruity flavor to the mix. And because these muffins are made with Greek yogurt instead of butter, each mini muffin contains just three grams of fat. Photo and recipe: Emily Miller / Life by Daily Burn
One of the most common misconceptions about eating plant-based/vegan is that it takes forever to prepare a good meal. Or that it’s all about frozen meals/entrees. While frozen vegan food is awesome (Amy’s non-dairy mac and cheese is life), it’s not healthy to rely on packaged vegan food all the time. There’s plenty of lazy vegan meals that can be made at home with simple ingredients (and cheap)! Here’s a large compilation of (90+!) vegan meal and snack ideas that take little to no time to prepare.

I want to make fermented cheeses though and will be experimenting a lot. I did recently use sunflower seeds in a recipe for cashew cheese (who can afford cashews these days!) and it turned out amazingly cheezy. I was making a quiche but the texture of the quiche was off (I only had extra firm tofu) and although it was really tasty, it wasn’t a huge success. I didn’t want to waste it so I boshed the quiche (I made it crustless) into a large batch of bechamel sauce that I was making for a vegan lasagna and it made the sauce AMAZING. Here’s the sunflower seed recipe if you want. I do have a vitamix blender (prehistoric from WAY back last century when we worked) but I am quite sure as the sunflower seeds are soaked, that you could get away with a cheaper blender or food processor, just let it run for a bit. Hope you like it. It tastes really cheesy.


I don’t use nutritional yeast any more. It’s like $20 a bag full here in Tasmania (that’s IF you can find it in the first place). I made a tapioca based cheese and it sat in the fridge as Steve wasn’t keen on it but then in my “waste not want not” phase, I decided to throw it into a batch of bechamel and again, it was amazing. Sometimes it’s not the product that is wonderful but how you can use it that matters. We can’t get Follow your heart products here (heck, we don’t even have Earth Balance!) but I have found several interesting starch based egg replacement products on the net (recipes for how to make). The best vegan quiche we ever made was based on chickpea flour so I guess it really is horses for courses.
What about evening snacking? The biggest problem with nighttime snacks is most of us reach for ice cream and chips-not fruit and yogurt. That's not to say you can't have a treat after dinner. Some of your favorite evening snacks may even be on this list (chocolate! popcorn!). One thing to note, if you're always hungry after dinner, make sure your meal is made up of filling and healthy foods and you're getting enough food. If all you're nibbling on is a lackluster salad you may legitimately be hungry and need an evening snack(see our best dinner foods for weight loss). If you love an evening snack after dinner, serve yourself a healthy portion onto a plate or bowl so you're not scooping straight from the container.
×