Protein: Studies show that women are less likely to munch mindlessly when they include protein in meals and snacks. For reasons not entirely understood, protein makes your belly feel full longer, and research suggests you're less likely to crave treats when you're satisfied. We've designed the diet to give you extra protein in simple forms — like a hardcooked egg or nuts — throughout the day.


If you're looking for a creative way to add more fruit to your diet, try frozen banana pops. Slice several peeled bananas in half and insert popsicle sticks. Coat each half with an ounce of low-fat plain yogurt. Put the pops in the freezer, and soon you'll have ready-to-eat low-calorie treats. At just under 80 calories a pop, this is a snack you can feel good about.
Not really corn but that’s what the blogger to the original recipe (linked below) called it so I’ll stick with that. That was my first time trying the Field Roast frankfurters. Usually I don’t buy shit from the hippie section because of my lame soy sensitivity but I need to start looking more because these are soy free options (no one cares) there once I really looked. These very much inspire me to want to step up my seitan game. I like making lazy, flavorless seitan but I think it would be in my best interest to at least know how to recreate these. Total game changer!
This is a kind of springtime Greek ratatouille. We love the artichokes in this dish—they add their unique flavor and somehow make everything taste just a little sweeter. The olive oil emulsifies with the braising liquid to create a silky sauce that deliciously coats the bright spring veggies. Thin lemon slices, charred and caramelized in a cast-iron pan, make a nice garnish.
Make a big batch of this soup and have a cup each afternoon. It’s packed with fiber and gingery flavor that will keep your stomach satiated for hours! Plus this carrot-ginger soup is packed with antioxidants. And since carrots are rich in vitamin A, this healthy snack may also reduce the risk of heart attacks, protect vision, and lower the risk of getting certain cancers. One serving weighs in at a little over 100 calories and 7 grams of waist-slimming fiber.
For this saucy Korean-style cauliflower snack, you can toss the golden-brown nuggets in either a sweet soy-garlic sauce or a sweet-and-spicy chili sauce, depending on your taste. The cauliflower florets' thin, shatteringly crisp crust is thanks to the same cornstarch, flour, and vodka batter we use for our Korean fried chicken—it's perfect for soaking up either sauce. We add sesame seeds and coconut flakes to the batter to give it a nice nuttiness and extra crunch. Leave out those ingredients, and your fried cauliflower is great for serving Buffalo-style.
“You might assume that you can’t eat pulses like chickpeas, beans, and lentils on the keto diet. But you totally can, especially in smaller portions," says Amy Gorin, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in the New York City area. "Pulses are a good source of satiating protein and an excellent source of filling fiber—and research shows that eating them daily can help your overall health and can even help you lose weight." Roast chickpeas and toss with oil (for added fat) and spices (to amp the flavor).
Need to use up some leftover ingredients? Make a pita pizza! Don’t fret about making the dough, that’s what whole grain pita bread is for. While pita bread makes filling and tasty sandwiches, it’s also a great base for loading toppings on. Whole grain pita bread is typically high in protein and fiber, and it’s ideal for the lazy vegan because it’s already cooked for you! Pita pizza is also awesome because it’s just the right size for one person. Start with pita bread, spread on some sauce, add some non-dairy cheese, and pile on any vegetables you have on hand. This Vegan Pepper Jack Cashew Cheese is my favorite as it will add some spice to your Homemade Pita Bread. For an easy fix, use store-bought vegan cheese like Daiya or Tofutti. Mushrooms, tomatoes, spinach or broccoli are healthy options for vegetable toppings, and many of these can come frozen or from a jar. Check out this Ultimate Guide to Making Homemade Pizza and simply use a pita for the base. After assembled, pop your pita in an oven at 425 degrees for 8-10 minutes and you’ve got yourself a quick and wholesome meal.
Complete proteins. Proteins are made up of amino acid building blocks, which are used to repair muscle tissue and build new proteins. A complete protein is one that contains all 9 of the essential amino acids the body needs (English, 2015). Lacto-ovo vegetarians can get all of these amino acids from eggs. It has been found that eating a variety of plant proteins can provide all the essential amino acids and thus providing ample protein for the body. For example: having rice with lunch and then beans with dinner will result in consumption of all the essential amino acids. Additionally, many plant foods provide all of the essential aminos acids including quinoa, chia seeds,beans, and buckwheat (American Dietary Association, 2009).
One of the most common misconceptions about eating plant-based/vegan is that it takes forever to prepare a good meal. Or that it’s all about frozen meals/entrees. While frozen vegan food is awesome (Amy’s non-dairy mac and cheese is life), it’s not healthy to rely on packaged vegan food all the time. There’s plenty of lazy vegan meals that can be made at home with simple ingredients (and cheap)! Here’s a large compilation of (90+!) vegan meal and snack ideas that take little to no time to prepare.
According to experts, snacking in between meals wards off hunger and aids weight loss by maintaining blood-sugar levels and reducing blood insulin levels. "When your body produces less insulin, you're much less likely to convert dietary calories into body fat," says weight loss expert Dr. Wayne Scott Andersen. "If we feed the body at regular intervals we send a signal to the body that it doesn't have to store calories," he adds.
"When I'm looking to get a little leaner, I reach for raw flax crackers topped with avocado. I prefer raw flax crackers over the wheat variety because they don't contain gluten, which can make me a little puffy. They are also intensely rich in omega-3s, which helps produce radiant skin and a faster brain!" — Dana James, nutritionist and founder of Food Coach NYC

Sure it's low-cal and low-carb, but a cup of this sweet orange melon also provides more than a hundred percent of the day's vitamin A. This fat-soluble nutrient helps maintain eye and skin health in addition to boosting immune function. Although cantaloupe tastes great on its own, it also pairs well with cottage cheese, another item that made this list!
Skip the typical pasta and sauce and make some super Easy Peanut Noodles. You’ll most likely have all the ingredients you need on hand. Peanut noodles taste divine, make fantastic leftovers and are superbly filling. For any peanut butter lover like myself, peanut noodles make an outstanding savory meal and they’re high in protein! Try these Noodles With Peanut-Miso Sauce and feel free to swap out the kelp noodles for noodles of your choice. For the lazy cook, make a large batch of Zucchini Noodles and use them sporadically throughout the week. These raw noodles would taste fresh and zesty with a peanut sauce. For the sauce, make sure to add miso to it as this will provide luxurious tastes and that umami flavor we all crave.
Although fall is the synonymous season of pumpkin EVERYTHING, if you’re on the keto diet, you shouldn’t skip pumpkin seeds. They’re loaded with healthy fats and protein, and this smoky snack only has four simple ingredients. Get the recipe from DeSantis here, which uses smoked paprika, garlic powder, sea salt, and your choice of oil (for more healthy fat!).
When tomatoes are out of season, you can still make great bruschetta by breaking out a can. Slowly roasting canned whole tomatoes concentrates their flavors, and mixing them with basil and red wine vinegar as a topping for toast produces a delicious year-round snack. We like to rub the toasts with garlic before spooning on the tomatoes to get an extra layer of flavor.

Ah, i need to make some chz but I’m not sure when. The cheese I have on my mind is tapioca based. Definitely need a soy free cheese because I doubt Mark will eat it (or eat much of it). Its funny because if I make something soy based he’ll eat it so I don’t have to. But if I make vegan cheese he often doesn’t. At least if it has a bunch of nutritional yeast he’ll avoid it.


"Diet-friendly snacking doesn't necessarily have to be low-fat," says McLachlan. What's more important: Portion size. A homemade trail mix of walnuts, mini chocolate chips, and raisins is a snack that's satisfying (thanks to the sweetness and fat) and healthy for a dieter if portion sizes are kept in check. "Mix a palm full of walnuts with a pinch of chocolate chips and a pinch of raisins — it's not always realistic to measure," says McLachlan.
×