There are simple tricks to help out any lazy cook with making meals. The most important trick is to keep lots of spices and sauces in your kitchen. Spices like turmeric, black pepper and sea salt, cinnamon and cayenne pepper are sure to pair well with most plant-based ingredients. These Chipotle Vegetable Stuffed Avocados are flavored with …yup, you guessed it: chipotle. Sauces like teriyaki, soy, mustard and balsamic are great starters in marinades for plant-protein sources like tofu, beans or tempeh. Another trick for the lazy cook is to use basic, yet satisfying ingredients. This means straying away from processed foods and choosing fresh or frozen vegetables and grains instead. Here are some of the best meal ideas that would suit any lazy chef. These ideas are economical, hearty, vegan-friendly, and best of all, don’t require your whole night in the kitchen.
No, that isn't a typo. This skinny alternative really has just 35 calories per serving! It isn't too shocking when you consider that makers of the treat replaced the cream and milk typically found in ice cream with water and whey protein. While staffers who tried this stuff out thought the taste was on point, they did note that the texture was more icy than creamy. For more low-cal ice cream alternatives, check out these best ice creams for weight loss.

If you enjoy articles and recipes like these and want more, we highly recommend downloading the Food Monster App. For those that don’t have it, it’s a brilliant food app available for both Android and iPhone. It’s a great resource for anyone looking to cut out or reduce allergens like meat, dairy, soy, gluten, eggs, grains, and more find awesome recipes, cooking tips, articles, product recommendations and how-tos. The app shows you how having diet/health/food preferences can be full of delicious abundance rather than restrictions.


This colorful creation makes for a festive appetizer or a delicious bite-sized snack. Thanks to the zucchini base, they're loaded with vitamin A, magnesium, omega-3 fatty acids, zinc, calcium, and protein, just to name a few of its many nutrients. Plus the sun-dried tomato adds a dose of vitamin, iron, and antioxidants. While the goat cheese adds a boost of protein to keep you feeling full and satisfied longer.
Where I live, in Sydney, Australia, there is a sushi shop on every corner. Sushi is always cheap, fresh and readily available. However, if you live in a place where sushi is difficult to come by, simply make your own. Most good Asian grocery shops stock everything you’ll need: sushi rice, nori paper, wasabi, mirin, soy sauce and cucumber. The rice should be made with vinegar and sugar. Limit your portion to approximately 30 grams of dry rice – not much.
Known for being a cheap staple, rice and beans is a classic lazy person’s meal that’s also good for you! Brown rice is packed with hardy nutrients and can be made in large batches to last for a few days worth of meals. If you don’t have the time to cook rice on the stove, opt for using instant. Although the texture will be different, this is still a healthier option for the time-crunched than processed foods and breads. Beans make a killer counterpart to rice as they are incredibly cheap and will keep you full for hours. Black beans, kidney beans, chickpeas or black-eyed peas are all quality options and are easy because you can buy them in a can. Make sure to rinse them well before using. Check out this White Bean Wild Rice Hash or this Cilantro, Lime and Black Bean Rice for either a side dish or a main course, and see Easy Ways to Spruce Up Classic Rice and Beans for more help to those feeling lackadaisical.

Granola bars are perfect for so many moments: breakfast time; an at-work or school-safe snack; a picnic, playground, or on-the-trail treat; an after-school “moooooooom I’m hungry” snack; or even (if they’re really good) an after-dinner snack to crush your sugar cravings. But did you know that homemade granolas are super easy to make at home and have way less sugar than their storebought counterparts? We’ve got this easy granola bar recipe for you today that is packed full of protein and healthy fats AND it 100% vegan!


This fresh seasonal salad is ridiculously easy to put together and quite versatile. Serve our suggested amount as a side salad with grilled steak, chicken, or fish, or eat a double portion as a main dish. You can also stick with the serving size listed here and add canned oil-packed tuna or sliced rotisserie chicken breast for a filling lunch. Leftovers fare well as is, tucked into tacos, or added to whole-grain salad bowls.

A mini-meal snack is a good idea when dinner is a long way off. The combo of tomato soup and baby carrots is not just filling; it also gives you lots of body-healthy nutrients, like potassium, cancer-fighting lycopene, and beta-carotene. Try a microwavable soup cup that you can stash in your car's cup holder. (Concerned about sodium? Pour about a quarter of the soup down the drain and dilute the rest with water, says McLachlan.)

Making your own raisins at home might sound silly, but these oven-dried grapes are a cut above the sad, shriveled raisins you buy in a box. Plumper and juicier, they have a flavor that's more similar to fresh grapes—just concentrated, and with a little caramelization. Try playing around with different varieties and cooking times to find the flavor and texture that you like.
This classic Sicilian eggplant dish, terrific as a spread, a dip, or a pasta sauce, is proof positive that vegan food doesn't have to be bland. The sweet-and-sour mixture packs in all sorts of intense flavors, including pine nuts, mint, raisins, capers, and vinegar. Even with the long ingredient list, it's not that hard to make: By cooking the ingredients in a particular order, we've engineered this recipe to use just one skillet.
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