I want to make fermented cheeses though and will be experimenting a lot. I did recently use sunflower seeds in a recipe for cashew cheese (who can afford cashews these days!) and it turned out amazingly cheezy. I was making a quiche but the texture of the quiche was off (I only had extra firm tofu) and although it was really tasty, it wasn’t a huge success. I didn’t want to waste it so I boshed the quiche (I made it crustless) into a large batch of bechamel sauce that I was making for a vegan lasagna and it made the sauce AMAZING. Here’s the sunflower seed recipe if you want. I do have a vitamix blender (prehistoric from WAY back last century when we worked) but I am quite sure as the sunflower seeds are soaked, that you could get away with a cheaper blender or food processor, just let it run for a bit. Hope you like it. It tastes really cheesy.
This another “snack” that I personally wouldn’t choose. Coffee really doesn’t fill you up and soy milk is heavily processed. Every now and then, we all need a pick me up. You can have about a cup and a half of “light soy milk” but make sure you check the brand you prefer so that you stick within 100 calories. Black coffee has zero calories, kids. That’s what I drink.
A calorie-free beverage doesn't qualify as a real snack, but if you find yourself scouting the kitchen just because you're bored, rather than hungry, this tasty drink may just hit the spot. Plus, green tea has been shown to help dieters lose more weight, according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, thanks to its metabolism-boosting antioxidant compound called EGCG.
This fresh seasonal salad is ridiculously easy to put together and quite versatile. Serve our suggested amount as a side salad with grilled steak, chicken, or fish, or eat a double portion as a main dish. You can also stick with the serving size listed here and add canned oil-packed tuna or sliced rotisserie chicken breast for a filling lunch. Leftovers fare well as is, tucked into tacos, or added to whole-grain salad bowls.

If you're looking for a creative way to add more fruit to your diet, try frozen banana pops. Slice several peeled bananas in half and insert popsicle sticks. Coat each half with an ounce of low-fat plain yogurt. Put the pops in the freezer, and soon you'll have ready-to-eat low-calorie treats. At just under 80 calories a pop, this is a snack you can feel good about.


No, that isn't a typo. This skinny alternative really has just 35 calories per serving! It isn't too shocking when you consider that makers of the treat replaced the cream and milk typically found in ice cream with water and whey protein. While staffers who tried this stuff out thought the taste was on point, they did note that the texture was more icy than creamy. For more low-cal ice cream alternatives, check out these best ice creams for weight loss.
When tomatoes are out of season, you can still make great bruschetta by breaking out a can. Slowly roasting canned whole tomatoes concentrates their flavors, and mixing them with basil and red wine vinegar as a topping for toast produces a delicious year-round snack. We like to rub the toasts with garlic before spooning on the tomatoes to get an extra layer of flavor.
This is a kind of springtime Greek ratatouille. We love the artichokes in this dish—they add their unique flavor and somehow make everything taste just a little sweeter. The olive oil emulsifies with the braising liquid to create a silky sauce that deliciously coats the bright spring veggies. Thin lemon slices, charred and caramelized in a cast-iron pan, make a nice garnish.
If you're craving something sweet and sinful, grab this mini pack of jelly beans. With just 4 calories in each bean, they're the slimmest way to enjoy cotton candy, toasted marshmallows, and strawberry shortcake. As an added bonus: Jelly Belly uses real fruit purees to flavor their beans. It's still candy in every sense, but it's certainly the lesser of many sugar-loaded evils.
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