"Diet-friendly snacking doesn't necessarily have to be low-fat," says McLachlan. What's more important: Portion size. A homemade trail mix of walnuts, mini chocolate chips, and raisins is a snack that's satisfying (thanks to the sweetness and fat) and healthy for a dieter if portion sizes are kept in check. "Mix a palm full of walnuts with a pinch of chocolate chips and a pinch of raisins — it's not always realistic to measure," says McLachlan.
Making homemade potato chips is surprisingly easy—just slice the potatoes thin, boil them in vinegar-spiked water, and fry until crispy. The vinegar keeps the chips from getting too dark as they fry. All of our custom potato chip seasonings are vegan, and this one, despite the name, is no exception. Savory nutritional yeast helps mimic the taste of the roasted bird; we grind it up along with granulated garlic, lemon zest, dried thyme, and dried mushrooms to round out the flavors, then toss the spice blend with freshly fried chips to coat.
Protein: Studies show that women are less likely to munch mindlessly when they include protein in meals and snacks. For reasons not entirely understood, protein makes your belly feel full longer, and research suggests you're less likely to crave treats when you're satisfied. We've designed the diet to give you extra protein in simple forms — like a hardcooked egg or nuts — throughout the day.
Who doesn’t love a good snack? They’re essential for staving off hunger between meals and keeping you fueled from your early morning workout until your late night dinner with friends. But small bites can also be a nutritional trap, providing few nutrients and tons of unnecessary calories. A 2012 study examining the diets of nearly 5,000 adults found that almost a third of their daily calorie intake was from “empty,” or nutritionally void, snack calories.
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