Use this guide as a great starting point for a lot of healthy snacks (and a few that are not so healthy). Of course, you don't need to be vegan to enjoy some of these tasty snacks. These snacks are also great if you are heading to a potluck, office party, or school event. By bringing a vegan snack, you'll share a healthy option and something that someone who may be dairy-free, gluten-free, or vegan (or vegetarian) can happily enjoy.
One of the most common misconceptions about eating plant-based/vegan is that it takes forever to prepare a good meal. Or that it’s all about frozen meals/entrees. While frozen vegan food is awesome (Amy’s non-dairy mac and cheese is life), it’s not healthy to rely on packaged vegan food all the time. There’s plenty of lazy vegan meals that can be made at home with simple ingredients (and cheap)! Here’s a large compilation of (90+!) vegan meal and snack ideas that take little to no time to prepare.
Instead of meaty mushrooms, this vegetarian pâté relies on nutty pecans and the deep umami flavor of roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for butter and cream to get a smooth consistency, but you can easily replace those ingredients with oil and vegetable stock in the same quantities. The result is a dip that's slightly less pâté-like, but just as tasty.

Tomato soup is full of disease-fighting nutrients, but contains as little as 74 calories per cup, no cholesterol, and less than 1 gram of saturated fat. Just keep in mind that there are many varieties. Cream of tomato is significantly higher in fat and calories. When buying canned soup, look for labels that say "low sodium" and check the calorie count.
Healthy choices start in the grocery store. For me, I like to pretend that I do all of my shopping at Whole Foods. It’s basically a dreamland for anyone, but especially plant based vegans and is probably my favorite place, ever. I feel healthier just by being there!! I don’t buy all of my groceries from there quite yet – only the special superfood or vegan items I can’t find anywhere else, along with the 10 other things I didn’t plan on buying, but had to have. Must be the abundance of organic everything and fancy gourmet goodies that are actually vegan! Anyone else?!!! I know you’re obsessed too..
I don’t use nutritional yeast any more. It’s like $20 a bag full here in Tasmania (that’s IF you can find it in the first place). I made a tapioca based cheese and it sat in the fridge as Steve wasn’t keen on it but then in my “waste not want not” phase, I decided to throw it into a batch of bechamel and again, it was amazing. Sometimes it’s not the product that is wonderful but how you can use it that matters. We can’t get Follow your heart products here (heck, we don’t even have Earth Balance!) but I have found several interesting starch based egg replacement products on the net (recipes for how to make). The best vegan quiche we ever made was based on chickpea flour so I guess it really is horses for courses.
Making your own raisins at home might sound silly, but these oven-dried grapes are a cut above the sad, shriveled raisins you buy in a box. Plumper and juicier, they have a flavor that's more similar to fresh grapes—just concentrated, and with a little caramelization. Try playing around with different varieties and cooking times to find the flavor and texture that you like.
I love that you have so many bowls of things! Those are my favorite–and I’m really lazy, so I go across the street to Whole Foods and pick up cooked rice/other carby thing, pre-cut or steamed vegetables, some beans or tofu, and I’m set for lunch or dinner. Breakfast is another bowl–fruit, some homemade granola (or crumbled up cookies…) and Kite Hill yogurt.
But it’s far from slim pickings when it comes to vegan snacks that are meat-, dairy-, and egg-free. We’re here to dig you out of your hummus-and-carrots rut with 19 sweet and savory vegan recipes that take less than 10 minutes to put together—because really, when that mid-morning crash, afternoon slump, or post-dinner pang hits, who wants to wait longer than that?
Known for being a cheap staple, rice and beans is a classic lazy person’s meal that’s also good for you! Brown rice is packed with hardy nutrients and can be made in large batches to last for a few days worth of meals. If you don’t have the time to cook rice on the stove, opt for using instant. Although the texture will be different, this is still a healthier option for the time-crunched than processed foods and breads. Beans make a killer counterpart to rice as they are incredibly cheap and will keep you full for hours. Black beans, kidney beans, chickpeas or black-eyed peas are all quality options and are easy because you can buy them in a can. Make sure to rinse them well before using. Check out this White Bean Wild Rice Hash or this Cilantro, Lime and Black Bean Rice for either a side dish or a main course, and see Easy Ways to Spruce Up Classic Rice and Beans for more help to those feeling lackadaisical.
Volumetrics is an eating plan championed by Barbara Rolls of Penn State University, and it's based on getting more mileage out of low-density foods. For example, a huge salad—or in this case, nearly 4 cups of popcorn—will leave you more satisfied than a square of chocolate, and for far fewer calories. If you're someone who gets depressed by measly portions, reach for healthy snacks that have a high water content like fruits, veggies—or our favorite crunchy munchie: popcorn. For a pre-popped variety, we love SkinnyPop because it's free of additives and tasty without being too salty.
Vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is exclusively found in animal products (Office of Dietary Supplements, 2016). This vitamin is important for red blood cell formation and metabolic processes. Non-vegan vegetarians may obtain vitamin B12 from eggs, milk, or other dairy products. Vegans may need a dietary supplement to get enough, although breakfast cereals and other products are sometimes fortified with the vitamin.
For this saucy Korean-style cauliflower snack, you can toss the golden-brown nuggets in either a sweet soy-garlic sauce or a sweet-and-spicy chili sauce, depending on your taste. The cauliflower florets' thin, shatteringly crisp crust is thanks to the same cornstarch, flour, and vodka batter we use for our Korean fried chicken—it's perfect for soaking up either sauce. We add sesame seeds and coconut flakes to the batter to give it a nice nuttiness and extra crunch. Leave out those ingredients, and your fried cauliflower is great for serving Buffalo-style.
Six grams of sugar in three of these chai-infused vanilla cookies?! It doesn't get much better than that. In lieu of butter, Bakeology uses coconut oil to bind the organic ingredients that make up their dessert, which is good news for your belly. The tropical oil converts into energy more easily than other types of fat, so less flab is apt to be stored on your frame. We're also big fans of the real bits of cinnamon, ginger, ground cloves and cardamom that give these cookies an authentic chai flavor.

Bust out your slow cooker and make some chili. A pot of chili will last you all week long and is perfect for any season and for any meal. Vegan chili is super easy; all you need are some spices, a couple cans of beans, and simple vegetables like corn, onion, and tomatoes. Chili is adaptable and tastes super with other ingredients like beer or sweet potatoes. This Three Bean and Sweet Potato Chili is a vegan wonder as you just need to add your ingredients and let them simmer. Same goes for this Sweet and Spicy Pumpkin Chili. Chili also makes for an extraordinary make-ahead meal. For the more adventurous, add some vegan sour cream or cheese for an extra indulgence. To use up those leftover pantry goods, this Frito Chili Pie is an American bar-food staple that definitely suits a lazy vegan lifestyle. For more slow cooker ideas beyond chili, try using protein-packed lentils in stews and soups.
If you’re craving chips and dip but don’t want to compromise your healthy diet, reach of some buckwheat crackers with herby edamame dip instead. Both buckwheat groats and edamame are packed with protein, making them an ideal option to help ward off hunger. Buckwheat groats also filled with nutrients like zinc, copper, manganese, and magnesium. Plus this dip is so creamy and flavorful, you’ll likely forget that it’s actually healthy.
Take my advice. Try it. It’s so frigging easy. Just bish bash bosh the dry stuff together (easier if you buy the spices already ground but still easy peasy if you don’t) and then the wet stuff and thanks to the coconut oil it’s very easy to form into shape and roll. I have had a go at making vegan cheeses. I once made a recipe for vegan pot luck on one of my old blogs for a stromboli using homemade “cheeze”. I want to make fermented cheeses as Steve used to love cheese a LOT. Here’s the link to that recipe. It makes a great stromboli or pizza cheeze.
Volumetrics is an eating plan championed by Barbara Rolls of Penn State University, and it's based on getting more mileage out of low-density foods. For example, a huge salad—or in this case, nearly 4 cups of popcorn—will leave you more satisfied than a square of chocolate, and for far fewer calories. If you're someone who gets depressed by measly portions, reach for healthy snacks that have a high water content like fruits, veggies—or our favorite crunchy munchie: popcorn. For a pre-popped variety, we love SkinnyPop because it's free of additives and tasty without being too salty.

So uh, what can you snack on when following a keto diet? These easy grab-n-go keto diet snacks will help you hit your macro goals while never getting hangry. If you want to take it a step further we developed the Women's Health Keto Made Simple bookazine, a new keto guide and meal plan (with 70+ recipes!) that'll help you lose weight on the keto diet while still eating all your fave foods.
Making your own raisins at home might sound silly, but these oven-dried grapes are a cut above the sad, shriveled raisins you buy in a box. Plumper and juicier, they have a flavor that's more similar to fresh grapes—just concentrated, and with a little caramelization. Try playing around with different varieties and cooking times to find the flavor and texture that you like.

Ah, i need to make some chz but I’m not sure when. The cheese I have on my mind is tapioca based. Definitely need a soy free cheese because I doubt Mark will eat it (or eat much of it). Its funny because if I make something soy based he’ll eat it so I don’t have to. But if I make vegan cheese he often doesn’t. At least if it has a bunch of nutritional yeast he’ll avoid it.
Freekeh is a cereal made from roasted green wheat. That's the one and only ingredient in this snack's original blend, making it an ideal packaged snack. With zero sodium, four grams of fiber, six grams of protein, and only 130 calories per quarter-cup serving, you can help yourself to an extra-large serving. Try rosemary sage or tamari when you want to mix things up.
Other good vegetarian snacks include roasted chickpeas, baked kale chips, sliced vegetables with a couple tablespoons of hummus, energy bars, or a piece of fruit with peanut butter. Adding nut butters, seeds, nuts, cheese, or beans to a snack is a good way to get additional protein. For more snack ideas, see the recipes and snack recommendations below.
With Whole Foods being the epitome of all things fresh and healthy, all those special vegan treats and goodies can be loaded with fat and unnecessary oils. I’ve been making a conscious effort to follow this low fat, high carb plant based diet (without stressing about it though) because it allows me to feel my absolute best, eat unlimited amounts of food and maintain my weight without paying attention to calories, portions etc. You can just be. There is no other lifestyle like that! 
This classic Sicilian eggplant dish, terrific as a spread, a dip, or a pasta sauce, is proof positive that vegan food doesn't have to be bland. The sweet-and-sour mixture packs in all sorts of intense flavors, including pine nuts, mint, raisins, capers, and vinegar. Even with the long ingredient list, it's not that hard to make: By cooking the ingredients in a particular order, we've engineered this recipe to use just one skillet.
×