And its cheap too. I was buying my chickpeas and processing them myself (resulting in a somewhat less than fine flour) as I thought that would be the cheapest way to get chickpea flour (as you do) and then I checked out the price difference at the health food shop and it was at least a dollar cheaper to buy the flour. Now I just buy the flour that is super fine and perfect for just about everything.

Six grams of sugar in three of these chai-infused vanilla cookies?! It doesn't get much better than that. In lieu of butter, Bakeology uses coconut oil to bind the organic ingredients that make up their dessert, which is good news for your belly. The tropical oil converts into energy more easily than other types of fat, so less flab is apt to be stored on your frame. We're also big fans of the real bits of cinnamon, ginger, ground cloves and cardamom that give these cookies an authentic chai flavor.


I am SO envious of you guys for your ability to just trot into a store and buy whatever vegan cheeses, faux meats etc. your hearts desire. We get hideous vegan cheese here, you can’t even call it cheese because it borders on melted plastic and quorn, which tends to be made using egg white base so bollocks to vegans. The only other alternatives are heinously tough hotdogs that never sell. I am seriously thinking of starting a sodding Aussie vegan food company right here! You want easy peasy seitan hotdogs that will knock anything else out of the ballpark? Just get your dry ingredients sorted, bosh in your wet, mix and roll in foil then steam. DONE. Mary’s test kitchen rules for creating these babies. We have them a lot. We thought that the flavour was a little low so we just doubled everything in the flavour recipe aside from the coconut oil and chilli and they are Steve’s go to favourite hotdogs now. Try these. You will love them. I guarantee! http://www.marystestkitchen.com/vegan-hot-dogs-2-paprika-seitan-sausages/
Ditch the store-bought granola brands (which are often packed with artificial ingredients) for this delicious DIY bar. Made with chunks of dried apple, pecans, toasted oats and cinnamon, each bite will satisfy your apple pie cravings. The other good news is that it serves up only five grams of sugar. Make a batch ahead of time and then stash some in your desk so you’ll always have something to nosh on. Photo and recipe: Carmen Sturdy / Life by Daily Burn
When tomatoes are out of season, you can still make great bruschetta by breaking out a can. Slowly roasting canned whole tomatoes concentrates their flavors, and mixing them with basil and red wine vinegar as a topping for toast produces a delicious year-round snack. We like to rub the toasts with garlic before spooning on the tomatoes to get an extra layer of flavor.
It's as simple a snack recipe as can be, but unusually satisfying: For a twist on plain homemade popcorn, try drizzling it with olive oil and sprinkling it with za'atar, the heady Middle Eastern spice blend of oregano, thyme, sesame seeds, and tart sumac. You can check out all our popcorn flavors here, including Thai coconut curry, miso soup, and roast chicken dinner; those three are vegan if you swap out the butter.
The vegan community has been growing at a fast rate which means there are so many more recourses available to everyone. Finding alternatives is no longer considered a daunting or hard task. Eating vegan meals can be easy, can be delicious and we are going to show you just that. Snacks are the key food item that helps us feel tied over in between meals but they are also great pairings for getting us through emotional events or just a movie time treat. We have discovered 13 guilt-free vegan snacks that are 100 calories and less.

Can snacking be a part of a healthy diet? Of course! When you choose a snack, choose one with protein, fat and/or fiber. All of these nutrients take longer to digest, so they fill you up. Snacks are also a great way to add extra nutrition to your day. Think of snacks like carrots and hummus, an apple with almond butter or whole-grain crackers with cheese.


This is a kind of springtime Greek ratatouille. We love the artichokes in this dish—they add their unique flavor and somehow make everything taste just a little sweeter. The olive oil emulsifies with the braising liquid to create a silky sauce that deliciously coats the bright spring veggies. Thin lemon slices, charred and caramelized in a cast-iron pan, make a nice garnish.


We combine everything you love about Chinese takeout—the sweet, savory, spicy sauce; the super-crispy tofu; and the crisp-tender, perfectly caramelized vegetables—into one quick vegetarian main. Celery takes on a leading role rather than a base ingredient here: It maintains its crunch, adds a natural saltiness, and is a nice foil to the more robust flavors in the dish. Szechuan here refers to the stir-fry method rather than a tingling, chile-laden heat. If you want more spice, swap the crushed red pepper for one or two very thinly sliced Thai red chiles.
Eating snacks with the right ratio of nutrients, with the right calories, will help keep your body energized and help you lose weight. Protein (plus exercise) fuels the growth of lean muscle mass, which boosts metabolic rate and increases calorie burn. Fiber, meanwhile, helps improve digestion and keeps you from binging on fats and sugars. So while there's no food that will literally "burn fat" while you eat it, smart choices with these ingredients will help your body operate at maximum efficiency. Bowerman suggests snacks under 200 calories, with 10 grams of protein and close to 5 grams of fiber. Here are 22 of our favorite healthy snacks.
“Crackers do not stave off hunger well,” Culbertson says. Low in fiber and high in sodium, this snack does not provide the energy boost most people are looking for during the afternoon, and you’re not likely to feel satisfied. (However, some crackers are high in fiber and low in sodium; and topping them with low-fat cheese takes them from a bad snack to a healthy one.) And if they’re not single-serving packages, Culbertson says, it's easy to eat too many.
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