There are simple tricks to help out any lazy cook with making meals. The most important trick is to keep lots of spices and sauces in your kitchen. Spices like turmeric, black pepper and sea salt, cinnamon and cayenne pepper are sure to pair well with most plant-based ingredients. These Chipotle Vegetable Stuffed Avocados are flavored with …yup, you guessed it: chipotle. Sauces like teriyaki, soy, mustard and balsamic are great starters in marinades for plant-protein sources like tofu, beans or tempeh. Another trick for the lazy cook is to use basic, yet satisfying ingredients. This means straying away from processed foods and choosing fresh or frozen vegetables and grains instead. Here are some of the best meal ideas that would suit any lazy chef. These ideas are economical, hearty, vegan-friendly, and best of all, don’t require your whole night in the kitchen.

Going vegan doesn't mean you don't get to eat snacks. You may be wondering what you can snack on in between meals, late at night, or just when you're out and about and on the go. There's plenty to choose from. You don't have to just eat carrot sticks, although, with a bit of hummus or some vegan ranch dressing, veggies are fantastic healthy vegan snacks.


When tomatoes are out of season, you can still make great bruschetta by breaking out a can. Slowly roasting canned whole tomatoes concentrates their flavors, and mixing them with basil and red wine vinegar as a topping for toast produces a delicious year-round snack. We like to rub the toasts with garlic before spooning on the tomatoes to get an extra layer of flavor.
Don't let the high fat content in pistachios scare you off -- most of the fat is unsaturated or "good" fat. Eat 20 pistachios, and you'll only take in 80 calories and less than a gram of saturated fat. Plus, they're rich in protein, fiber, and several key vitamins and minerals. To avoid an unhealthy dose of sodium, eat them raw or dry roasted without salt.
Packed with fiber, water, and antioxidants, fruits and vegetables are great choices for diet-friendly snacking. But the standard banana or carrots and ranch dip can get old quick. Instead, try a sliced apple with a lowfat cheese wedge, like Laughing Cow Light. "Having a little extra fat is good in a snack because it sustains you longer," says McLachlan.

Complete proteins. Proteins are made up of amino acid building blocks, which are used to repair muscle tissue and build new proteins. A complete protein is one that contains all 9 of the essential amino acids the body needs (English, 2015). Lacto-ovo vegetarians can get all of these amino acids from eggs. It has been found that eating a variety of plant proteins can provide all the essential amino acids and thus providing ample protein for the body. For example: having rice with lunch and then beans with dinner will result in consumption of all the essential amino acids. Additionally, many plant foods provide all of the essential aminos acids including quinoa, chia seeds,beans, and buckwheat (American Dietary Association, 2009).
“Crackers do not stave off hunger well,” Culbertson says. Low in fiber and high in sodium, this snack does not provide the energy boost most people are looking for during the afternoon, and you’re not likely to feel satisfied. (However, some crackers are high in fiber and low in sodium; and topping them with low-fat cheese takes them from a bad snack to a healthy one.) And if they’re not single-serving packages, Culbertson says, it's easy to eat too many. 
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